Monday, December 17, 2012

Teen Review: Revisiting old favorites

by J.K. Rowling
734 pages
Fantasy
Book 4 of 7
12 and up

S Y N O P S I S

As the summer comes to an end, Harry attends the Quidditch World Cup with the Weasleys, but what starts out as a wonderful event ends in terror as Voldemort's followers publicly foreshadow the coming years. Harry makes his way back to Hogwarts to discover that his beloved school of witchcraft and wizardry is hosting an international tri-wizard tournament between Hogwarts and two other schools, one in France and one in Eastern Europe. Harry watches as the sixth- and seventh-year students of each school put their names into the Goblet of Fire with the hope of representing their school, and then is stunned as he is chosen, for the first time in the history of the tri-wizard tournament, as a fourth contestant.

R E V I E W
Finally, with this book, teenagers can relate to the world's favorite young wizard. It's not easy making a fantasy novel to which young adults in today's world can really relate, but Rowling has pulled it off with The Goblet of Fire, arguably the bildungsroman of the Harry Potter series, as our hero faces not only his own growing maturity, but also experiences a terrifying event that causes his final loss of innocence and the return of his greatest nemesis.

My Rating: 5/5

by J.K. Rowling
759 pages
Fantasy
Book 7 of 7
13 and up
Reviewed by M.K., 12th grade

S Y N O P S I S

For the first time since the day his old friend Hagrid knocked down that door, Harry will not be attending Hogwarts. With Snape's betrayal, Dumbledore's absence, and the rise of Voldemort, Harry faces his greatest challenge. He's a marked man, all alone but for his loyal friends, Ron and Hermione. As the world of magic encounters its darkest and most horrible time, it is up to Harry to find the remaining horcruxes, learn about the secret life of Dumbledore, uncover the truth behind his own past, and stop Voldemort once and for all in the epic conclusion to the series.

R E V I E W

As the final installment, Deathly Hallows is the traditional story of our hero fighting against all odds with limited help. His sacrifices, the sacrifices of his friends, and his bravery make this book stand out as the smartest and most mature of the series. And though some have argued that its ending was a bit far-fetched and poorly done, I liked Rowling's decisions, and think that Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is a worthy conclusion to the story of the world's most beloved young wizard.

My Rating: 5/5

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